Words on Page Again 72

My feet are cold. I really should get up from the computer and find some warm slippers to combat the chill of yesterday’s snowfall, but I just received a most wonderful review of Traitor’s Moon, and I’m newly awed at the feeling of having connected with a reader. She couldn’t put the book down–that’s always music to an author’s ears, and she noticed the development of one of my secondary characters whose growth during the story was so remarkable that he became, in her mind, the main character.

I am grateful for her insight, and it’s hard to describe the joy at having touched another person with my story.

I’m working on chapter 21 of the 4th book in the Coin Forest series. It follows Traitor’s Moon. I appreciated the inspiration and created this photo quote.  Hope your day is filled with beautiful words.

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Ireland Writer Tours 2016

As I mentioned earlier, I will be teaching in a unique setting this August when I team up with multi-published YA/Middle Grade author Dianne Salerni to present the “Secrets to Publishing Success” conference. It will include private consultations and writing classes, with plenty of time for brainstorming plotting ideas.

Dunguire Castle Small

Ireland Writer Tours combines the excitement of touring the Emerald Isle with the inspiration and help of a personal writer’s conference

These surprisingly affordable tours are a heady combination of writing workshops and visiting fascinating attractions in Ireland — a fourteenth century abbey, haunted castles, stone circles, mysterious lakes — it sounds too good to be true, but it is! I’m excited to see all these inspirational sights and share my secrets about publishing and marketing. Something I love even more than writing is inspiring other writers to follow their hearts to create successful, award-winning stories.

This tour has been described as the perfect holiday or birthday gift. I first learned of it through Pam Nowak and Susan Spann. Pam attended the tour last year, and all of my writer cells screamed for me to attend with her, but I couldn’t. I so wanted to stow away in her suitcase. She was generous about sharing, though, and I saw photos of her touring days.  Pam will be presenting a June conference on Craft, Career and Publishing.

Susan, a publishing attorney, presented last year and posted several pictures that made me drool. You can see her post at http://www.susanspann.com/looking-for-a-writing-retreat-try-ireland-this-summer/

And here’s a general post from the tour organizers at http://www.theroadlesstraveledireland.com

This is heaven-on-earth for writers. Come on and join me for the writing, the sights, and the inspiration!

 

 

 

 

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Real Writers Write – a plan for us NaNoWriMo “holdouts”

Real Writers Write

A plan for us NaNoWriMo “holdouts”

 

Inspired by the RMFW conference, my critique partners and I are participating in a writing challenge this fall. In an effort to develop the daily writing habit, we declare our intentions, much as the NaNoWriMo participants do. We challenge ourselves with so many words a week or so many pages a week, with a goal to write daily.

 

I’m sure you’ve heard the comments by NYTBSA’s like Nora Roberts, Stephen King, et al, who, when asked about their daily routine, stress that real writers write. They write each and every day. That consistency is what helps them release over three and more novels a year.

 

Slacker me, I crank out one when I have the perfect combination of inspiration and time, zero when I don’t.

 

A cartoon circulated about ten years ago depicted two rooms full of writers, all typing away on their keyboards. Under the cartoon on the top, it read “Unpublished writers.” Under the identical cartoon below, it read, “Published Authors.” The message was simple: as a striving-to-be-published author, one needs to work hard to learn the craft. While studying writing components such as plotting and characterization are necessary, learning only occurs when the principles are applied, i.e., during the writing.

 

And as a published author, your fans and your publisher will want you to produce at least one book a year, preferably more, so one should write, and write frequently.

 

If we write to be rich and famous, we become dependent on external validation to make that happen, and without it, it’s likely we’ll lack adequate inspiration to write every day.

 

If we write to please ourselves, the writing is intensely personal and there’s less pressure. I write because it’s a joy, and it’s extremely entertaining. I also enjoy sharing my work, and it delights me when others enjoy my words, so I must write to publish.

 

Must we write every day? I propose that the rule need not be so absolute. There are days of accidents and heartaches and legal difficulties and the flu. Let’s not allow that little voice inside to deride us and sap our confidence if we miss a day here or there. I haven’t set a daily rate for each week within this challenge, but I’ve set a goal that requires, if not daily writing, most days writing.

 

Because I’m a confirmed plotter and hopeless editor-in-progress, NaNoWriMo is a fantastic program that I’ll likely never try. Adapted to my needs, however, it can serve as inspiration to get me there.

 

So far, it’s working well, and I’ve made my goal for four weeks straight. I’m beginning to feel the rhythm of daily writing, and it makes the story I’m writing much more exciting.   I would love making sufficient progress to eventually release a book every six months.

 

Are you participating in NaNoWriMo or a modified version with your critique buds? What are your goals for November?NaNoWriMo

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Tabor’s Trinket breaks through to Top 100 Bestselling Medievals on Amazon!

Tabor’s Trinket made the Top 100 Bestselling Medievals List today on Amazon. I was just browsing, and what a pleasant surprise!  Here’s a screen shot. #59! A little fuzzy, but it sure made my day! Thank you for the part you played in its success!Trinket #59 Top 100 Medievals 10.26 smaller

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The happiness advantage – to write better novels, lighten up!

What’s behind the happiness craze? In Colorado Style, The Washington Post’s Brigid Schulte wrote an artcle, “Boost happiness with a few simple daily habits.” A recent issue of Parade’s cover headline reads, “50 Shades of Happy,” and the August Golf Digest cover declares it’s their “Happiness Issue.”

In one of those golf articles, contributor Bob Carney discusses a golfer on his high school team who was the happiest golfer he ever knew. He would be happy no matter the weather or what he shot, and he was not only the best player on the high school team, he was also the luckiest. His 6-handicap, Carney says, wasn’t all magic. It turns out there’s scientific proof that this “happiness edge” exists.

Shawn Achor, Harvard researcher and author of The Happiness Advantage, claims our brains, in positive mode, perform significantly better than they do in negative, neutral or stressed modes. Carney quoted five-time Open Championship winner Peter Thompson, who said, “You can think best when you’re happiest.”

So why are we all so hard on ourselves on the golf course, or at our computers, writing novels? One reason, Carney suggests, is that we “model” experience. We have preconceived notions about the “right” way to raise children, choose a mate, or in our case, write or promote our novels. These notions can be time-saving, but if we take them too seriously, we begin to believe that this is the way the world really works.

Are our theories about how to write a good novel simply a construct, also?

Annika Sorenstam’s coach, Lynn Marriott, says we have a negativity bias, that we store negative experiences in a deeper and more permanent way than we do our positive experiences. This suggests that we can undo the harmful, negative bias by replacing it with a positive bias.

If we have a propensity to imbed the negative, it will take a little more effort, but we can learn to apply this concept to make our writing more joyful, more satisfying.

Close your eyes and think back to the first time you wrote fiction—how excited you were, how magical it all seemed, creating a story from your heart, from that beautiful, magical place we call creativity. You couldn’t wait to write more, to discover what happened next, to watch your characters come to life on the pages.

Time, as we know, passes. Some stories get rejected, some get admired, some get published. We trudge on, dragging our feet through the industry “mud” of dashed hopes, disappointing letters in the mail, demanding editors, indifferent agents, careless reviews, puny sales numbers.

Over time, the joy fades, and our creative hearts need replenishing.

Take a deep breath. Hug your manuscripts and/or published books, and recall that early joy. Armed with positive thoughts, dwell on your successes and enjoyment. Remember to relish those memories, because it takes more effort to embed the positive.

When you’re preparing to edit (or, let’s be honest, “thinking” about preparing to edit, or tying yourself in the chair to force yourself to edit), engage encouraging thoughts.

Capture old, negative thoughts and turn them on their ear. Dash memories of plotting gone bad, and critique sessions that leave your manuscript bleeding from all the comments. You may have to hand back your bleeding manuscript to your critique partners and ask them to write two good things about your pages. Then you can take control and read and re-read those positive comments, giving them the same power as the critical comments . This will help you enter into your editing session with a hopeful, happy outlook, better able to tackle any problem areas.

When you’re gearing up to write new material, hug your creative mind and give it a jump start. Think of three or more outstanding memories of your writing, times when you could sing, you were so happy.

When you finished a scene that made you cry. Or laugh.
When you wrote a piece of dialogue that impressed you so much, you wanted to dance.
When someone looked you right in the eye, gave you a smile, and said they really enjoyed your writing.
When you wrote “The End” for the first time.
When you read a fantastic, positive review of your book, written by an obviously intelligent reader.

You’ll think of other gems. They’re in your memory bank, just temporarily dulled by the hard knocks that come with the industry.

Writing this blog made me happy. I hope it makes you happy, too. Join me next month as I continue my happy writing thoughts.

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Join me on a unique retreat and tour in Ireland!

Dunguire Castle Small

I have been invited to present group classes, workshops and individual critiques for the prestigious Ireland Writer Tours next summer.  The workshop will focus on small presses and self-publishing, along with craft and related topics.  RMFW’s Writer of the Year, Susan Spann, has been blogging about her experience with the tour this summer. She has some excellent photos and memories to share.  These writer tours are so exciting! It’s a combination mini-writer’s conference and an unforgettable tour of haunted castles, faerie forests, and mysterious lakes and caves. Yes, I’ll be working, but I’ll also be touring with the attendees, soaking up all the atmosphere and magic that the Emerald Isle can offer.  More later, and if you have ever had any questions about writer tours like this, let me know, and I’ll get some insider answers for you!

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Tabor’s Trinket Wins International Book Award!

Tabor IPPY Award

Happy Birthday to me!  (actually in 2 weeks, but this wonderful surprise came early!)  Tabor’s Trinket, Book One in the Coin Forest series set in 15th century England, won the international IPPY award in the Romance category!  IPPY is the Independent Publisher Book Awards, the world’s largest book awards competition, and it drew 6,000 entries this year from USA, Canada, Australia/New Zealand and Europe!  Awards celebration party in New York on May 27.  I’m doing my Serena Williams’ “just-won-a-major-title” dance!  I’m honored, because with thousands of entries, I know there were some very worthy titles out there, and I’m grateful.  And very, very happy!

 

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